Celebrating Black History Month: Satchel Paige

Posted on by Kerel Cooper

As we celebrate Black History Month I will do a blog post each week throughout the month of February that honors the Negro Leagues. This weeks video is a tribute to Satchel Paige who is regarded as one of the best pitchers in baseball history.


This video is courtesy of ExpandedBooks YouTube Channel

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4 Responses to Celebrating Black History Month: Satchel Paige

  1. I'm a Negro League history buff and a Mets fan since I can remember.

    Nice post about a GREAT, GREAT, man.
    I have that book by Larry Tye and I also named my Bullmastiff puppy after Satchel.

    Looks like ole Satch pitched better at age 59 than any pitcher the Mets had in 1965.
    They could have used him then.

    • kerelcooper says:

      Thanks for the comments. It's really amazing to hear some of the stories. The MLB Network has been doing a good job with some of their shows and giving some insight into the history of the Negro Leagues.

  2. A shout out to Happy Chandler for not waiting for the dude without a soul, Judge Landis' body to grow cold in 1944 before he backed Branch Ricky idea of signing Jackie Robinson to a minor league contract in 1945.

  3. Quote Happy Chandler:

    "I've already done a lot of thinking about this whole racial situation in our country. As a member of the Senate Military Affairs Committee, I got to know a lot about our casualties during the war. Plenty of Negro boys were willing to go out and fight and die for this country. Is it right when they came back to tell them they can't play the national pastime? You know, Branch, I'm going to have to meet my Maker some day. And if He asks me why I didn't let this boy play, and I say it's because he's black, that might not be a satisfactory answer.
    If the Lord made some people black, and some white, and some red or yellow, he must have had a pretty good reason. It isn't my job to decide which colors can play big league baseball. It is my job to see that the game is fairly played and that everybody has an equal chance. I think if I do that, I can face my Maker with a clear conscience."

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